How to Collect Aboriginal Art — Starting a Collection

Starting a Collection

A collection is a curious thing. The best can be far greater than the sum of its individual parts. If it is put together with care, love, and scholarship, it can be enlightening and provide a genuine service to those that seek to understand the subject that it covers.

  • Author: Adrian Newstead
  • Issue: 6

Latests Articles

How to Collect Aboriginal Art — Aesthetic Considerations

In common with others the world over, Aboriginal artists develop their art practice from youth to old age and, as they do so, their medium and imagery passes through many developmental stages. Some achieve notoriety relatively early in their careers, while others do not achieve wide recognition until after their death, by which time their paintings may sell for far more than anything they were paid during their lifetime. In retrospect, we are able to look at an artist’s output (their oeuvre) and determine those periods and styles that have struck a stronger chord, were more successfully realised, and, as a consequence, hold greater affection in the collective imagination.
  • Author: Adrian Newstead
  • Issue: 8

How to Collect Aboriginal Art — What Makes an Indigenous Artist Important

The importance of an indigenous artist can be related to both their cultural role and their creative output. Most of the determining factors that work in the contemporary and international art markets hold true for indigenous art as well.
  • Author: Adrian Newstead
  • Issue: 7

Calendar of Events

List of exhibitions and events coming up on the Cooee Calendar

Next in Series - How to Collect Aboriginal Art - & Calendar of Events

A collection is a curious thing. The best can be far greater than the sum of its individual parts. If it is put together with care, love, and scholarship, it can be enlightening and provide a genuine service to those that seek to understand the subject that it covers.

Auction Artwork Review - Lot #36 Lin Onus, Fish and Storm Clouds (Guyi Na Ngawalngwal) - 1994

Specialist Adrian Newstead discusses the artwork by Lin Onus in the May 29th, 2018 Auction Auction Artwork Review - Lot #36 Lin Onus, Fish and Storm Clouds (Guyi Na Ngawalngwal) - 1994

by:   published: 19th May 2018

Invitation - Gala Preview Auction Thursday 24th May 2018

Invitation - Gala Preview Auction Thursday 24th May 2018

My Country - Kudditji Kngwarreye

21st July to 4th August 2018
Location: Paddington Cooee Art Gallery
Address: 326 Oxford Street, Paddington, NSW 2021

July

05

2018

Cought in the Wind

5th to 19th July 2018
Location: Paddington Cooee Art Gallery
Address: 326 Oxford Street, Paddington, NSW 2021

The Dealer is the Devil

An Insider's History of the Aboriginal Art Trade
by Adrian Newstead OAM
foreword Djon Mundine OAMpublisher Brandl & Schlesinger

Part road trip, part memoir, part history, part political commentary, The Dealer is the Devil is illuminatingly thought-provoking and provocative. It is an incredibly exciting and fast paced account of the fluctuating fortunes and exponential success of the Aboriginal art movement, with all of the elements one would expect of a complex drama, played out on a national and international stage.

"Every rock, every hill, every water, I know that place backwards and forwards, up and down, inside out. It`s my country and I got names for every place."

Queenie McKenzie at Black Fellas Creek, Old Texas, 1995
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